Home » Event Photography » Digital Photography

Although photography largely involve an eye for beauty and a natural instinct for clicking the camera, it is still important for photographers especially those that are just starting in the field to gather some experience in actual photography. Some practice on their spare time and learn the techniques on their own but this will take a lot of clicking time and magazine reading.

This is why most will go for the short-cut by enrolling in schools that offer short courses in photography. Of course, this will not guarantee to make you a master photographer in months but at least you already have all the tools that you need to make your way to the world of shapes and colors.

Here are some of the things that you should consider when looking for a good photography school to enroll to.

1. Course outline

This is perhaps the most important thing that you have to think about when looking for a school. The course outline will help you determine if the course is suited to the training that you need. It will contain a rundown of all the lessons that students like yourself will tackle in the class.

Take a look at the list and try to see if all the things that you need to learn are already there. If you find it lacking, try to shop around for other photography courses in the same school or better yet inquire in another school. With a lot of schools, museums and centers offering photography courses, chances are you will find the one that fits you to a T.

2. Specialization

There are courses that are offered according to certain specializations. For instance, some courses concentrate entirely on nature photography. Others go for portraits and human interest pieces. There are even some that do nude photography classes.

In other words, there are a multitude of specializations that you can go into. You can even take all of them; but of course, you have to shell out big bucks for that.

3. Laboratory and field work

Photography is a largely experiential field. You learn not from reading about it or discussing about the theories but in actual taking of shots and doing field works. In the course outline, try to look for the number of hours that will be spent outside the classroom.

Ideally, about 75 percent of the whole course should be used as practice time in fields or in the dark room. Only a quarter should be spent for theories and basics. Some courses offer a 50-50 ratio. Shop around for courses that emphasize field works and experiential learning as these are the courses where you can learn more.

Visit Us On TwitterVisit Us On FacebookVisit Us On Google PlusVisit Us On PinterestVisit Us On YoutubeVisit Us On LinkedinCheck Our Feed